News Archive

Being Well

May 2017

Tableau (web extra) - As coleader of the Virtue, Happiness, and the Meaning of Life project, Vogler is an expert on living meaningfully. She and her collaborators study universal issues: “questions about the relations between being a good person and enjoying your life or having happiness, and having a sense of meaning or purpose,” she says. “We want to think about what it takes for those to line up.” And because the issues are universal, she’s eager to share the project’s work beyond the academy (through a blog, a podcast, a lecture series, and a culminating conference open to all).

Scholarship of Self-Transcendence

May 2017

Tableau - When she devised the project, Vogler says, “The ambition was to get a kind of deep integration between people working in very different disciplines” without relegating their work to the margins of less widely read, explicitly interdisciplinary publications. And it worked: the participants are “doing disciplinary work, they’re publishing in the disciplinary journals, and the inspiration for it is coming out of the frame of the project.”

Take the First Step to Happiness - and Get Over Yourself!

February 2017

Virtue Insight - A keynote speaker at the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues’ annual conference at Oriel College, Oxford, Candace Vogler speaks to journalist Richard McComb about the project.

Cultivating Happiness

January 2017

Suburban Living - The concept of happiness as finding meaning in something beyond ourselves is at the core of an interdisciplinary project at the University of Chicago called Virtue, Happiness and the Meaning of Life, which one of their blog posts identifies as “the three constituents of the good life.”

UofSC to host on the relationship of the humanities and happiness Dec. 14

November 18, 2016

UofSC - How do the humanities matter in a chaotic 21st century? That’s the question one of the nation’s top philosophers and ethics experts will tackle in a public talk Dec. 14 at the University of South Carolina.

Filling the Hole in the Middle of Our Lives

September 27, 2016

Chicago Catholic - At a recent talk sponsored by the Midtown Educational Foundation, whose after school and summer programs focus on virtue development -- developing kids of exceptional character, particularly for those from families of limited resources, Candace Vogler discussed how virtue turns lives from ordinary to extraordinary regardless of other circumstances.

Philosophy Professor Addresses the Purpose of Life in Virtue Initiative Lecture

April 12, 2016

The Chicago Maroon - [Anselm] Müller’s lecture was a part of the larger Virtue, Happiness, and Meaning of Life initiative, a 28-month project funded by the Templeton Foundation. The initiative believes that self-transcendence—the feeling of belonging to something bigger than oneself—is the foundation of a virtuous and meaningful life. To study how self-transcendence can help make virtuous living lead to meaning and happiness, the initiative attempts to bring together theologists, philosophers, and psychologists. Müller, also Professor Emeritus at the University of Trier, is part of the Visiting Scholars Program, which brings scholars to teach courses at the University of Chicago which relate to the Virtue Initiative’s research. Müller is teaching the course Final Ends this quarter.

Importance of Self Transcendence

February 25, 2016

The Matt Townsend Show, BYU Radio - Dr. Candace Vogler is the David B. and Clara E. Stern Professor of Philosophy and Professor in the College at the University of Chicago, and Principal Investigator on "Virtue, Happiness, and the Meaning of Life," a project funded by the John Templeton Foundation.  Dr. Vogler discusses her research in to Self Transcendence and how to "get over yourself."

London @ Large - Jennifer Frey

January 25, 2016

NewsTalk 1290 CJBK - "The self can be a kind of prison that we can't break out of."

Philosophers received $2 million to research the importance of "getting over yourself"

January 24, 2016

Quartz - Self-obsessed people who just can’t “get over themselves” hardly sounds like a subject worthy of academic research. But Candace Vogler, from the University of Chicago, and Jennifer Frey, from the University of South Carolina, disagree. The importance of “getting over yourself”—or self-transcendence—is key to their major 28-month project on virtue, happiness, and the meaning of life. The research proposal received a $2.1-million grant from the John Templeton Foundation and unites a team of around 20 international scholars, working in philosophy, religion, and psychology.          

U of C Professor Studies Role Happiness Plays In Life

January 23, 2016

WBBM 780/109.5FM  - Professor Candace Vogler has launched a project called, “Virtue, Happiness and the Meaning of Life.” She says there is a common thread uniting those who are truly happy.  “The way you live your life is in seeing it connection with something bigger and better than you are,” Vogler said. “That’s the thing that can allow your life, your daily life, to be a source of joy and meaning for you.”

Money for the meaning of life

December, 2015

The Philosophers' Magazine - Philosophers from the University of South Carolina and the University of Chicago have been awarded a 2.1 million grant from the John Templeton Foundation to study the connections between virtue, happiness and the meaning of human life and society.

Happiness granted

November 30, 2015

UofSC - “One thing that’s really fascinating to me about this grant is that we have a lot of people coming from different faith and intellectual backgrounds, but they’re all saying kind of the same thing, which is that human beings want to work for something the value of which can’t be explained just in terms of self-interest or personal welfare.” And it’s not an all-or-nothing proposition. As Frey explains, there are degrees of transcendence.                      

Q&A: Philosopher Candace Vogler on virtue, happiness and the meaning of life 

November 25, 2015

UChicagoNews - In an unassuming office on the fourth floor of Wieboldt Hall, Prof. Candace Vogler is working to answer some of the most vexing problems of human existence: Why are some people happy, and others not? What makes life good and meaningful? Vogler, the David B. and Clara E. Stern Professor of Philosophy, is a principal investigator of “Virtue, Happiness and the Meaning of Life,” a 28-month research project supported by the John Templeton Foundation. For someone trying to understand the meaning of life, Vogler seems surprisingly undaunted. 

John Haldane to speak on Happiness at the University of South Carolina; live-streamed Dec. 14, 7pm est

November 18, 2015

Press Release. COLUMBIA, S.C. - Internationally renown scholar John Haldane will give a lecture at the University of South Carolina on Dec. 14, 2015, as part of a new research project which brings together scholars from around the world to study the factors which lead to deep happiness and meaning in life. Hadane will discuss the growing consensus in the field of positive psychology that virtues are the cornerstone of a happy life. His 7 p.m. lecture will also be live-streamed at virtue.uchicago.edu/haldane.

How can you be happier?

November 16, 2015

The University of Chicago Magazine. Candace Vogler and Jennifer Frey do not consider virtue, happiness, and the meaning of life to be the same thing—but do consider them related. They will present their findings through various academic channels, including two new courses taught by visiting scholars in spring 2016 and spring 2017. However, as Vogler said, “We want this to stay in touch with ordinary human beings” and not just academics. With that in mind, here are four ideas from her Humanities Day lecture—some of which admittedly may not be news—about leading a meaningful life: 

Pursuit of happiness leads to a $2.1 million grant award for USC

November 2, 2015

SC.edu Research News. While sociological and psychological research suggests that happiness can lead to positive outcomes such as better physical and mental health, higher productivity and life satisfaction, more work is necessary in order to understand how happiness connects with the cultivation of virtues like justice and fortitude, and how the virtues contribute to a sense of life's ultimate meaning for individuals.  

$2.1 million grant funds project looking for the meaning of life

October 30, 2015

The Chicago Maroon. “It will be a huge breakthrough if our team can begin to show in a rigorously interdisciplinary way that virtue, happiness and meaning in life are related not merely in theory but also in practice.” 

Collaborative research project to examine sources of happiness and personal fulfillment

October 5, 2015

UChicagoNews. A new research project at the University of Chicago and University of South Carolina will bring together scholars from different fields to study the factors that bring about deep happiness and a sense of meaning in one’s life. 

Is Being Virtuous the Key to Happiness? Here's Two Million Bucks to Find Out

September 16, 2015

Inside Philanthropy. Does virtue put us on the path to true happiness? That’s the subject of the latest not-so-typical research grant from a not-so-typical foundation that’s often chasing concepts like the meaning of life.

Prof earns $2.1M grant to study virtue, happiness and meaning of life

September 9, 2015

Columbia Regional Business Report. “It will be a huge breakthrough if our team can begin to show in a rigorously interdisciplinary way that virtue, happiness and meaning in life are related not merely in theory but also in practice,” Frey said. “The implications for social policy and education could be considerable.”

Pursuit of happiness leads to a $2.1 million grant award for UofSC, UChicago

September 3, 2015

SCNow.com. A pair of philosophy researchers from the University of South Carolina and the University of Chicago has been awarded a $2.1 million grant from the John Templeton Foundation to study the connections between virtue, happiness and the meaning of human life and society.

Pursuit of happiness leads to a $2.1 million grant award for University of South Carolina, Chicago

September 3, 2015

EurekAlert!. While sociological and psychological research suggests that happiness can lead to positive outcomes such as better physical and mental health, higher productivity and life satisfaction, more work is necessary in order to understand how happiness connects with the cultivation of virtues like justice and fortitude, and how the virtues contribute to a sense of life's ultimate meaning for individuals.

City Snippits: Grant to study life questions.

August 24, 2015

Columbia Star. USC assistant professor Jennifer Frey and University of Chicago philosophy professor Candace Vogler are sharing a $2.1 million grant to study connections between virtue, happiness, and the meaning of human life and society.

$2.1 Million for the Meaning of Life

August 31, 2015

Daily Nous. Awards, Grants, Honors. Jennifer Frey (South Carolina) and Candace Vogler (Chicago) have received $2.1 million grant for their project, "Virtue, Happiness, and the Meaning of Life.

$2.1 Million for the Meaning of Life

Press release. Candace Vogler, Ph.D., and David B. and Clara E. Stern Professor of Philosophy at the University of Chicago and Jennifer A. Frey, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of South Carolina, have received a $2.1 million grant from the John Templeton Foundation to lead a 28 month research project titled, “Virtue, Happiness, and Meaning of Life.”